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The Temples

Kung Fu Tse Temple




A temple dedicated to the most famous of Chinas philosophers, honored for his teachings on moral, learning, interpersonal relations and the "order of the Universe".
During the Mao period in China Kung Fu Tse became forbidden, - books burned - , and even his tomb was totally destroyed with big sledge hammers by the rage and fury of the Red Guard.
In Taiwan, - on the other hand -,  it was compulsory to learn Kung Fu Tse, and the result is clear to see today when you compare the two Chinas.
There was a Kung Fu Tse temple in Taipei before the present one was built.
It was finished in 1884, but in 1907 it was torn down by the Japanese during the Japanese invasion.
Rebuilding of the next temple, - the one shown in this page -, was started at the present location in 1927 and finished in 1939 with all the traditional features of a Kung Fu Tse Temple.  And it has indeed turned out to become a most beautiful example of traditional Chinese architecture.

With quotes by Kung Fu Tse.
 
 


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The Li Gate
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)

There is another outer gate, - the Hong Gate -, you have to pass before you come to this western gate leading into the outer courtyard.
Through this Li Gate, you can see a similar gate on the eastern side, - the Yi Yu Gate.
 
 

To go beyond is as wrong as to fall short.
 
 
 
 


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The Lingxing Gate seen from the Pan Lake and the Pan Bridge.
The first gate you have to enter before coming to the outer of the two inner courtyard.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 

If we do not know life, how can we know death?
 
 


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The Lingxing Gate.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)

Worry not that no ones knows of you.
 
 


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The door of the Lingxing gate
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 
 
 


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The Wanren Gongqiang wall seen from the Pan Bridge.
This is a wall that all Kung Fu Tse Temples have, and it is there to prevent views inside from the street outside the wall.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 

The man of wisdom is newer of two minds.
 
 
 


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The Wanren Gongqiang wall, with picture of a fable animal "Qilung".
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 

Clever talk and a pretentious manner are seldom compatible with the benevolent.
 
 
 


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The Yi Gate seen through the Linxing Gate.
Take note of the prayer wheels to the right.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 

The superior man is satisfied and composed.
 
 
 


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The Yi Gate.
The last gate you have to enter before reaching the inner courtyard and the main hall.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 

Do not impose on others what you yourself do not desire.
 
 
 


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The painted ceiling of the Yi Gate.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 

Recompense injury with justice, and recompense kindness with kindness.
 
 
 


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Decoration on the Ii Gate.
(Photography © Karsten Peterson)
 
 

Virtue is not left to stand alone. He who practices it will have neighbours.
 
 
 


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Decoration on the Yi Gate.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 

To have friends come from afar is happiness, is it not?
 
 


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Decoration on the Yi Gate.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 

Only the wisest and stupidest of men never change.
 
 


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The stone paved inner courtyard with the main hall, - the Dacheng.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 

To learn and to practice what is learned time and again is pleasure, is it not?
 
 


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The paved courtyard in front of the Dacheng Hall.
Obviously some sort of ceremony is taking place involving high school students.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 

By nature,men are nearly alike.
 
 


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Obviously some sort of ceremony is taking place involving high school students.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 

Learning without thought is labor lost.
 
 


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A ceremony taking place involving high school students.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 
 
 
 
 


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The area between the main hall, - the Dacheng Hall -, and the western side buildings.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 
 
 
 


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The courtyard behind the Dacheng Hall.  To the left, - the Chongsheng Shrine.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 
 
 
 


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The interior of the Chongsheng Shrine.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 
 
 
 


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The interior of the Dacheng Hall.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 
 
 
 


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The central courtyard.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 
 
 
 


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The courtyard between the Yi Gate to the left, - and the Lingxing Gate to the right.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 
 
 
 


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The Lingxing Gate.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 
 
 
 


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The Lingxing gate with view to the Wanren Gongqiang wall.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 
 
 
 


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The Qilung fable animal on the Wanren Gongqiang wall.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 
 
 
 
 


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Peacock roof decoration on the Lingxing Gate.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 
 
 
 


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A Qilung carries the sun. Decoration on the Lingxing Gate.
(Photography © Karsten Petersen)
 

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Page initiated:  Jan.30.2013
Page updated:  Jan.31.2013