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M/T "STOLT MARKLAND"

- a Chemical Tanker from the Nineties -
 
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 

Builder:   Kleven Florø A/S, Norway
DWT: 29999
Length:  174, 5 m
Beam:  29,5 m
Draught:  9,79 m
Engine:  B&W 6L60MC
Brake horse power:  12480


Here comes the next tanker, - this time from the early nineties - - -
The difference from the eighties ship, - the "Stolt Eagle" -, is not so easy to see for the untrained eye, but now we actually have a real chemical tanker instead of a ship which is more like a product tanker.

The "Stolt Markland" was delivered in 1992 from the Kleven Florø Yard in Norway as number two in a series of four chemical tankers of the "Helluland" class.
Anyone who served on these ships are very happy about them.
They are "no nonsense" ships without too many unnecessary gimmicks, - easy to operate and a pleasure to sail.
They were what a sailor would call "nice ships", and they seemed to attract good people as well, and therefore they were also "happy ships". From a sailors point of view they were simply great ships to serve on.
However, - from a businessman's point of view, they have one serious drawback based on the fact that they were constructed with only single hulls. This is a bit strange, since the first real chemical tankers that came out about 20 years earlier already were constructed with double hull right from the start, but apparently the constructors of the "Helluland" class did not clearly see which way the wind was blowing concerning environmental protection.
When I joined the "Stolt Markland" about 10 years later, we clearly saw the result of this, because national and international laws about tanker design, simply excluded the nice ship from the most important markets.
Therefore the "Stolt Markland" and her sisters must have been some of the absolute last tankers in the world that was born without double hull, which by today's standards is an absolute "must".

Improvements on this ship from the nineties compared to the "Stolt Eagle" from the eighties is mainly that "Stolt Markland" has more tanks than the Stolt Eagle", and a part of the tank section is now made of stainless steel, making it possible to carry more aggressive cargoes like for example acids, and also she can carry more sensitive cargoes that might be spoiled if carried in a coated tank.
In the engine room the most obvious change is the introduction of more digital equipment and computer screens for control of the machinery, which we did not have in the "Stolt Eagle" - - - -

There is a lot more, but for now, please enjoy my pictures of a nice ship, - the "Stolt Markland" -, from the nineties - - - -
 
 
 

I have decided to start the "Stolt Markland" series with photos taken during a boat drill we did in the middle of the Indian Ocean back in 2001.
We simply sailed around the ship and saw it from all angles, and I will start this round trip with a picture from the bow, - and then continue clockwise around the ship - - -

Please enjoy - - -
 
 




"Stolt Markland"
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
Ocean watch, - and one of those magic moments.
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
- the bulb, - and a look into the magic of the deep, deep blue -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
- from my cabin, - the Chief Engineers day room -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 

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The Engine Room
 
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
- the engine top, - view from the casing -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
- a look from the top at B&W engine type 6L60MC, - and 12.480 bhp -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
- view along the engine top -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 
 


 "Stolt Markland"
- and another one from the opposite direction -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
- view to the bottom platform, - aux. engines to the left -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
- the main engine, - view along the intermediate platform -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
- the main engine, - view along the bottom platform -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
- view along the bottom platform with cooling water pumps -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
- the boilers -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
- the engine control room -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)

- a view of the nerve- and brain center of the whole ship where everything starts and stops!
(And YES!!!  It is Christmas time - -)
 
 


"Stolt Markland"
- the main control console, - now with computer screens as standard -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 

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Updated:   May 6. 2005, - Nov.18.2008