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M/T "Stolt Eagle"

(Chemical & Product Tanker)




Finally, - a different type of ship, - a tanker!
Actually not just a tanker, - but a "chemical & product tanker" - - -
People far away from the maritime world might ask: What exactly is a chemical tanker?   And a product tanker?
What is the difference?

I will try to make it short.
When the huge super tankers have brought their cargo of crude oil to the refineries, - the crude is refined to diesel oil, gasoline and lube oils in various grades, - as well as other products derived from the crude - - - -
Tankers carrying this sort of cargo are referred to as product carriers.
Typically the product carrier will carry only few different cargoes at the same time, - often even the same cargo in all tanks.
The cargoes they carry are of course not only limited to refined crude oil products, but also involve vegetable oils for the food industry, as well as various types of not too aggressive chemicals that does not have special requirements for extra cleanliness, heating or cooling - - -
Also the typical product tanker has relatively few tanks of relative large sizes, - and the tank section is of coated mild steel.

Those special cargoes that the product tankers cannot handle are handled by the chemical tankers - - -
They have typically smaller tanks, - but many more, often more than 50 -, and the tanks are made from high grade stainless steel that can handle virtually any chemical as long as it can be pumped, - including acids.
A real chemical tanker also have several means of heating the cargo, - steam, hot water, hot oil -, as well as machinery for cooling the cargoes that require low temperatures during the voyage.
Therefore a chemical tanker can be recognized by the much more complex deck lay-out, compared to the more simple and "clean" lay-out of the product tanker - - -
Typically the chemical tanker will carry many different cargoes at the same time.
Both types, - chemical- and product tankers -, have a separate and fully independent pumping, loading- and discharge system for each individual tank, so that the chance for mixing cargoes are minimized.

Therefore you can say, that anything a product tanker can carry, can also be carried by a chemical tanker, - but anything a chemical tanker can carry,  cannot necessarily be carried by a product tanker.
However, - most of the cargoes, - maybe even 99%??? -, can actually be carried on a product tanker, but some shippers may insist on having their cargo transported in for example a stainless steel tank, although a coated tank actually would be good enough.
Here the chemical tanker has a great advantage, because the stainless steel tanks are more easy to clean and therefore the problem with contamination of the cargo from a bad coating is eliminated, - because a coated tank will not last forever.
The coating WILL break down, - it might develop cracks, loosen from the steel, flake off or simply get worm -, so that the tank cannot anymore stand up to the highest standards for cleanliness.

So, - to make it short:
The "Stolt Eagle is such a product tanker with coated mild steel tanks, and she is NOT so sophisticated as a real chemical tanker, - like for example the  "Stolt Capability" -, that can handle virtually anything to the highest possible standards, as long as it can be pumped.

But now, - please enjoy some of my pictures of a typical chemical- and product tanker, - the "Stolt Eagle".
 
 


1980-12-026
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- at Corpus Christy, Texas, USA, - Oct. 4.1980 -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 

"Stolt Eagle" is the 6th. and last ship in the "Stolt Falcon" class.
Owners: Stolt Parcel Tankers, Houston, Texas, U.S.A
Builders: Korean Shipbuilding & Engineering Corp., Pusan, Korea.
Delivered: Feb. 1980
Length o. a.: 176,8 m
Beam: 29.6 m
Deadweight: 36.613 t.
Propulsion: Sulzer 6RND-76-M, 14.400 BHP.
Speed: 16 knots.
 


1980-01-063
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- at the KSEC yard, - Pusan, Korea -, just before delivery in 1980 -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


1980-01-065
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- at the KSEC yard, - Pusan, Korea -, just before delivery in 1980 -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 
 


1980-01-066
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- in dry dock, - showing the bulb bow at the KSEC yard, - Pusan, Korea -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 
 
 


1980-01-071
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- at the KSEC yard, - showing rudder and propeller -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 
 


1980-01-072
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- at the KSEC yard, - showing the stern section -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 


1980-02-020
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- at the KSEC yard, - Ohhhps!!  just "killed" a crane upon returning from sea trial -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


1980-02-017
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- at the KSEC yard, - showing the "Killed" crane -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


1980-04-091
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- finally!!!  - - ready to go to work on the big oceans, - here passing under the rainbow -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


1980-04-094
Family
- meeting a sister ship -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


1980-12-028
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- showing her the characteristic profile at Corpus Christy in 1980 -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


1980-14-025
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- the accommodation -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


1980-14-062
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- during passage of the Panama Canal -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


1980-14-065
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- twisting around the bend at Gaillards Cut in the Panama Canal -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


1980-15-013
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- enjoying the open sea -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


1980-15-023
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- a view of the rather simple deck layout of a product tanker -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


1980-04-070
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- the bridge, - with the late Duty Officer Herrera in charge -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


19809-04-069
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- the likewise late Andy Green, - Radio Officer -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)

If anyone wonders why Radio Officers are not used anymore in merchant ships, - this picture explains why!  :-)
 
 



1980-04-071
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- the Chief Engineers day room, - my cabin -
(The Chinese handmade silk carpet on the floor is NOT standard equipment, - but private!)
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


1981-01-015
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- battling rough weather -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 
 


1981-01-023
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- rough weather -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


1981-01-026
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- rough weather -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


1981-01-033
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- rough weather -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 
 


1981-03-005
M/T "Stolt Eagle"
- the main deck, - pipes and equipment underneath the catwalk -
(Photography by Karsten Petersen ©)
 

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Page initiated: Nov.12.2008
Page updated:  Nov.22.2009